Rupturing Tradition: Ancient Past, Contemporary Praxis

Courses

Categories: Fall 2020
Thursday, Sep 10, 2020   

This course brings together different forms of disciplinary knowledge in the humanities and social sciences with the intellectual and practical resources of activism in order to reconceptualize the study of classical antiquity both within the university and outside its gates. We move back and forth between exploring the contributions that ancient Greco-Roman texts might make to contemporary social and political problems and examining the disciplinary history of academic Classics as a site for critical reimagination. This course is a collaboration with the Activist Graduate School, an online school by, and for, experienced activists.

Click here for further information about the course.
 
The first synchronous session of “Rupturing Tradition” will meet on Zoom from 1:30-2:30PM (EST) on Wednesday, September 2.  A pre-recorded round-table lecture with all four professors will be available from noon on Monday, August 31.  
 
For the first session, we will be reading Audre Lorde, “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House”; The Combahee River Collective Statement; and this text on the practice of disruptive reading.  Please also watch the PBS documentary about Antigone in Fergusen.  
 
If you are not currently enrolled and would like access to the readings, the documentary, and the full syllabus to prepare for the first session, please e-mail Brooke Holmes (bholmes@princeton.edu) or Dan-el Padilla Peralta (dpadilla@Princeton.EDU) for the links and password to the Google Classroom site.  The site also has further instructions on using Flipgrid to create and upload a short recorded video introducing yourself to the group before we all meet on Wednesday, September 2.

 

 

Thursday, Sep 10, 2020   

This course brings together different forms of disciplinary knowledge in the humanities and social sciences with the intellectual and practical resources of activism in order to reconceptualize the study of classical antiquity both within the university and outside its gates. We move back and forth between exploring the contributions that ancient Greco-Roman texts might make to contemporary social and political problems and examining the disciplinary history of academic Classics as a site for critical reimagination. This course is a collaboration with the Activist Graduate School, an online school by, and for, experienced activists.

Click here for further information about the course.
 
The first synchronous session of “Rupturing Tradition” will meet on Zoom from 1:30-2:30PM (EST) on Wednesday, September 2.  A pre-recorded round-table lecture with all four professors will be available from noon on Monday, August 31.  
 
For the first session, we will be reading Audre Lorde, “The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House”; The Combahee River Collective Statement; and this text on the practice of disruptive reading.  Please also watch the PBS documentary about Antigone in Fergusen.  
 
If you are not currently enrolled and would like access to the readings, the documentary, and the full syllabus to prepare for the first session, please e-mail Brooke Holmes (bholmes@princeton.edu) or Dan-el Padilla Peralta (dpadilla@Princeton.EDU) for the links and password to the Google Classroom site.  The site also has further instructions on using Flipgrid to create and upload a short recorded video introducing yourself to the group before we all meet on Wednesday, September 2.