Pay Attention!

Events

Thu, Apr 5, 2012, 4:30 pm  

On Thursday, April 5th, Shigehisa Kuriyama—historian of science and medicine and the Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History at Harvard University—will be coming to Princeton to talk about his recent thinking on the history of attention. But “talk” is not exactly right, or at least it does not compass the varieties of experiment in media and interactivity that characterize his current work. As part of that experiment, Professor Kuriyama will crowd-source his presentation in advance, commissioning 90-second videos from any graduate student or faculty member at Princeton on the theme “Pay Attention!” Guidelines for these films are simple: 1) they should consider the question of attention; 2) they should draw from the maker’s research (and/or intellectual) interests; 3) the phrase “Pay Attention!” should be seen or heard at least once. We all have movie machines in our pockets now, and the question is, how can we put them to use for thinking together? Pay attention and find out.

If you are interested in participating—and the more the merrier!—email jdolven@princeton.edu for instructions on formatting and submitting your film. The deadline for submission is March 26. We will gather together to see what we have wrought, and what Professor Kuriyama makes of it, on Thursday, April 5th at 4:30 in East Pyne 010.

Born in Marugame, Japan, Professor Shigehisa Kuriyama studied for two years at Phillips Exeter Academy and two years in France before attending Harvard College. After obtaining his A.B., he trained as an acupuncturist for three years in Tokyo, and returned to Harvard where he received a Ph.D. in History of Science in 1986. His professional appointments (the Humanities Program at the University of New Hampshire; the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts at Emory University; and the International Research Center for Japanese Studies) prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 2005 have been notable for their explicit emphasis on interdisciplinary inquiry. His publications, for their part, have been marked by a consistent effort to probe broad philosophical issues through the prism of specific topics in comparative cultural history. He has also long been interested in techniques and styles of presenting knowledge. Professor Kuriyama’s The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (1999) received the William H. Welch Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine, and has been translated into Greek, Chinese and Spanish. His current projects includes studies on the relationship between money and the body in Edo era Japan and the history of presence.

Location: 
010 East Pyne
Thu, Apr 5, 2012, 4:30 pm  

On Thursday, April 5th, Shigehisa Kuriyama—historian of science and medicine and the Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History at Harvard University—will be coming to Princeton to talk about his recent thinking on the history of attention. But “talk” is not exactly right, or at least it does not compass the varieties of experiment in media and interactivity that characterize his current work. As part of that experiment, Professor Kuriyama will crowd-source his presentation in advance, commissioning 90-second videos from any graduate student or faculty member at Princeton on the theme “Pay Attention!” Guidelines for these films are simple: 1) they should consider the question of attention; 2) they should draw from the maker’s research (and/or intellectual) interests; 3) the phrase “Pay Attention!” should be seen or heard at least once. We all have movie machines in our pockets now, and the question is, how can we put them to use for thinking together? Pay attention and find out.

If you are interested in participating—and the more the merrier!—email jdolven@princeton.edu for instructions on formatting and submitting your film. The deadline for submission is March 26. We will gather together to see what we have wrought, and what Professor Kuriyama makes of it, on Thursday, April 5th at 4:30 in East Pyne 010.

Born in Marugame, Japan, Professor Shigehisa Kuriyama studied for two years at Phillips Exeter Academy and two years in France before attending Harvard College. After obtaining his A.B., he trained as an acupuncturist for three years in Tokyo, and returned to Harvard where he received a Ph.D. in History of Science in 1986. His professional appointments (the Humanities Program at the University of New Hampshire; the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts at Emory University; and the International Research Center for Japanese Studies) prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 2005 have been notable for their explicit emphasis on interdisciplinary inquiry. His publications, for their part, have been marked by a consistent effort to probe broad philosophical issues through the prism of specific topics in comparative cultural history. He has also long been interested in techniques and styles of presenting knowledge. Professor Kuriyama’s The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (1999) received the William H. Welch Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine, and has been translated into Greek, Chinese and Spanish. His current projects includes studies on the relationship between money and the body in Edo era Japan and the history of presence.

Location: 
010 East Pyne
Thu, Apr 5, 2012, 4:30 pm  

On Thursday, April 5th, Shigehisa Kuriyama—historian of science and medicine and the Reischauer Institute Professor of Cultural History at Harvard University—will be coming to Princeton to talk about his recent thinking on the history of attention. But “talk” is not exactly right, or at least it does not compass the varieties of experiment in media and interactivity that characterize his current work. As part of that experiment, Professor Kuriyama will crowd-source his presentation in advance, commissioning 90-second videos from any graduate student or faculty member at Princeton on the theme “Pay Attention!” Guidelines for these films are simple: 1) they should consider the question of attention; 2) they should draw from the maker’s research (and/or intellectual) interests; 3) the phrase “Pay Attention!” should be seen or heard at least once. We all have movie machines in our pockets now, and the question is, how can we put them to use for thinking together? Pay attention and find out.

If you are interested in participating—and the more the merrier!—email jdolven@princeton.edu for instructions on formatting and submitting your film. The deadline for submission is March 26. We will gather together to see what we have wrought, and what Professor Kuriyama makes of it, on Thursday, April 5th at 4:30 in East Pyne 010.

Born in Marugame, Japan, Professor Shigehisa Kuriyama studied for two years at Phillips Exeter Academy and two years in France before attending Harvard College. After obtaining his A.B., he trained as an acupuncturist for three years in Tokyo, and returned to Harvard where he received a Ph.D. in History of Science in 1986. His professional appointments (the Humanities Program at the University of New Hampshire; the Graduate Institute of Liberal Arts at Emory University; and the International Research Center for Japanese Studies) prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 2005 have been notable for their explicit emphasis on interdisciplinary inquiry. His publications, for their part, have been marked by a consistent effort to probe broad philosophical issues through the prism of specific topics in comparative cultural history. He has also long been interested in techniques and styles of presenting knowledge. Professor Kuriyama’s The Expressiveness of the Body and the Divergence of Greek and Chinese Medicine (1999) received the William H. Welch Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine, and has been translated into Greek, Chinese and Spanish. His current projects includes studies on the relationship between money and the body in Edo era Japan and the history of presence.

Location: 
010 East Pyne