Receptions of Latin Literature

Reading Groups

Blog category

This reading group focuses on the reception of Latin literature, in all its manifold genres, in European and American culture. This group takes a broad view of what constitutes reception studies, encompassing the influence of Latin literature on the intellectual history, literature, and visual arts of later periods, as well as studies of the history of the book and the transmission of ancient texts. Each term, we select an author, text, or concept from antiquity and trace its tradition across various fields of knowledge and in various languages from the late antique period through to the 21st century. The group meets on a monthly basis, and is focused around a series of talks by invited speakers. Participants are asked to complete pre-circulated readings in primary literature as well as any secondary sources that our speakers will recommend.

In the spring term of 2020 we will commence with a semester-long study of the reception of Seneca the Younger (see schedule below). Potential topics for discussion might include the influence of Seneca’s prose works on early modern political thought, appropriations of Senecan tragedy in Elizabethan period, the reception of Seneca as a biographical figure, and the transmission of his texts and their presentation in early editions.

This group welcomes the participation of graduate students and faculty from the departments of Classics, Politics, Comparative Literature, History, English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Art History, etc. Knowledge of Latin is not necessary for participation.
Contacts:
William Dingee
Jiani Fan

SPRING 2020 Schedule
Meetings will be held from 4:30 to 6:30 PM in 209 Scheide Caldwell on four Mondays this term:

 2/10: Gareth Williams (Columbia University): "Reception of the pseudo-correspondence of Seneca and Paul"

3/9: Bob Kaster (Princeton University): "The Vulgate Text of Seneca’s De beneficiis, 1475-1650"

4/6: Peter Stacey (UCLA): "On Benefits in Machiavelli"; Co-sponsored with the Center for Collaborative History and Comparative Literature THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED

5/4: James Romm (Bard College): "Seneca's Medea as a prophecy New World discoveries: the Renaissance debate"

Each meeting will be based on pre-circulated primary and secondary readings. This group welcomes the participation of graduate students and faculty from the departments of Classics, Politics, Comparative Literature, History, English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Art History, and other allied fields. Knowledge of Latin is not necessary for participation.

To be placed on the mailing list to receive pre-circulated materials, please contact William Dingee (wdingee@princeton.edu). Any questions may be directed either to William or to Jiani Fan (jianif@princeton.edu).

This reading group focuses on the reception of Latin literature, in all its manifold genres, in European and American culture. This group takes a broad view of what constitutes reception studies, encompassing the influence of Latin literature on the intellectual history, literature, and visual arts of later periods, as well as studies of the history of the book and the transmission of ancient texts. Each term, we select an author, text, or concept from antiquity and trace its tradition across various fields of knowledge and in various languages from the late antique period through to the 21st century. The group meets on a monthly basis, and is focused around a series of talks by invited speakers. Participants are asked to complete pre-circulated readings in primary literature as well as any secondary sources that our speakers will recommend.

In the spring term of 2020 we will commence with a semester-long study of the reception of Seneca the Younger (see schedule below). Potential topics for discussion might include the influence of Seneca’s prose works on early modern political thought, appropriations of Senecan tragedy in Elizabethan period, the reception of Seneca as a biographical figure, and the transmission of his texts and their presentation in early editions.

This group welcomes the participation of graduate students and faculty from the departments of Classics, Politics, Comparative Literature, History, English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Art History, etc. Knowledge of Latin is not necessary for participation.
Contacts:
William Dingee
Jiani Fan

SPRING 2020 Schedule
Meetings will be held from 4:30 to 6:30 PM in 209 Scheide Caldwell on four Mondays this term:

 2/10: Gareth Williams (Columbia University): "Reception of the pseudo-correspondence of Seneca and Paul"

3/9: Bob Kaster (Princeton University): "The Vulgate Text of Seneca’s De beneficiis, 1475-1650"

4/6: Peter Stacey (UCLA): "On Benefits in Machiavelli"; Co-sponsored with the Center for Collaborative History and Comparative Literature THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED

5/4: James Romm (Bard College): "Seneca's Medea as a prophecy New World discoveries: the Renaissance debate"

Each meeting will be based on pre-circulated primary and secondary readings. This group welcomes the participation of graduate students and faculty from the departments of Classics, Politics, Comparative Literature, History, English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Art History, and other allied fields. Knowledge of Latin is not necessary for participation.

To be placed on the mailing list to receive pre-circulated materials, please contact William Dingee (wdingee@princeton.edu). Any questions may be directed either to William or to Jiani Fan (jianif@princeton.edu).